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Economic Justice

Ex-offenders

Our faith calls us to support humanity, especially those with struggle in society, as we are all made in the image of God. Ex-offenders, who are often some of the most vulnerable people in society, have a fundamental right to human dignity, including basic amenities such as food, housing and employment.

Our prison system is marked by very high rates of recidivism—the re-arrest and return to prison of individuals who have already served a sentence before.

Jobs and Labor Issues

Jobs and Labor IssuesCatholic Social Teaching says that human beings should not be a means to an end and that the economy must serve the people, not the other way around. NETWORK believes in the right to a living wage, a safe work environment, and meaningful work.

Federal Budget, Debt and Taxes

NETWORK firmly believes that the federal budget is a moral document because it presents the clearest expression of our nation’s priorities. Just as a family prioritizes expenditures and decides how it will cover those expenses, so does a nation.   

NETWORK analyzes aspects of the federal budget each year in light of our faith, calling upon the totality of our Catholic social justice tradition. We are reminded that we are responsible for all of humanity and our varied ecosystems; and that we are to treat others as Jesus has before us.

Global Economic Justice

NETWORK believes that global economic justice requires fair trade policies.

U.S.

Food

"For I was hungry and you gave me food"(Mt 25:35). As Catholics, we are called to respect and uphold each individual’s right to life and dignity. Food insecurity, which is defined as the inability to meet basic food needs because of a lack of financial resource, diminishes an individual’s ability to lead a dignified life – and the fact that it exists in our rich nation is unconscionable.

Housing

HousingNETWORK believes that access to affordable, safe housing is an essential human right. The Catholic Bishops have taken a strong stand on this issue: “The magnitude of our housing crisis requires a massive commitment of resources and energy [and yet] federal spending for affordable housing and community development has become very uncertain.” (USCCB, February, 2011).

Connection

Our award-winning quarterly publication, the Connection, provides in-depth analysis of important social justice issues, along with examples of people who are making a difference. You can find copies of past issues on our archives page.

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